Camaya Bali

Camaya Bali:

The Jungle Oasis in Selat

Length of Stay: 2 Nights 
(December 2018)

Location:
Selat, Bali

Lodging Costs:
$64-$286 USD/Night

As I sit down to write this, I am half typing and half eating some Salak (a.k.a. Snake Fruit) that the owner, Made, gave to us from his garden. Let us just start by saying that Camaya Bali is far more than any AirBnB experience we've ever had. It’s so more than just a bed and a breakfast. It's hideaway in the jungles of Selat, Bali where there are no sounds of motorbikes or busy city streets.

The property has two different lodging options: a Private Bungalow, and an open style Bamboo House overlooking lush green rice fields lined with palm trees and gardens. They also have a booklet of activities like tours, massages, yoga class, and cooking classes available at additional costs. The Camaya Bali property also has their own small restaurant that serves delicious western and typical Balinese dishes.

Upon our arrival we were warmly greeted by the staff and they took our belongings while we sat down for a complimentary welcome drink. Everyone was so incredibly kind, it was so unusual and foreign to us to have that much attention. We’d just finished traveling in South America a few weeks prior, so this level of hospitality was unexpected.

Camaya Bali: Bamboo House
Camaya Bali: Restaurant
Camaya Bali: Rice fields
Camaya Bali: Rice fields
Camaya Bali: Sunset over Rice Fields
Camaya Bali: Rice Fields
IMG_1570 - 540 4x5
IMG_1589 - 540 4x5

Villa Nirvana:

A Private Bungalow

Amenities: Private Bed, Ensuite, Hammock, Outdoor Shower, Free Breakfast

Activities (not included in price): Rice Field Trekking, Motorbike Rental, Half/Full Day Tours, Balinese Massages, etc

Cost: $64 USD/Night - Sleeps 2

Out of the two Airbnbs in Camaya Bali, we stayed in this one. To be honest, it was quite pricey but we decided to splurge for a couple nights in order to be secluded in the heart of Bali. The property around the lodging really is extrodinarily beautiful. You can walk around to explore the lush green nature, or kick back in a hammock to enjoy the colorful sunsets. If you wake up early enough, you'll can even see Mt. Agung in the near distance.

Camaya Bali: Villa Nirvana
Camaya Bali: Villa Nirvana
Camaya Bali: Villa Nirvana
Camaya Bali: Villa Nirvana
Camaya Bali: Villa Nirvana
Camaya Bali: Villa Nirvana
Camaya Bali: Villa Nirvana
Camaya Bali: Villa Nirvana
Camaya Bali: Villa Nirvana
Camaya Bali: Villa Nirvana
Camaya Bali: Villa Nirvana
Camaya Bali: Villa Nirvana

Bamboo House:

The Luxury Cabin

Amenities: Two Beds, 1.5 Bath, Hammock, Balcony, Outdoor Shower/Hot tub, Kitchen, Free Breakfast, Free Scooter Rental

Activities (not included in price): Rice Field Trekking, Half/Full Day Tours, Priavte Driver, Balinese Massages, etc

Cost: $286 USD/Night - Sleeps 4

This Bamboo House has gained quite a bit of popularity on instagram. So much that it's booked out nearly a year in advance! We didn't actually stay in this house because it's out of our budget and isn't available anytime soon. But we made friends with the couple that was staying there during our time at Camaya Bali.

They checked out early and said we were more than welcome to take a look inside the famous bamboo house. We got to take some cool pictures while we had the place to ourselves for about an hour. It turns out we were very lucky since normally it costs about $70 USD to do an hour photoshoot at the Bamboo House!

Camaya Bali: Bamboo House
Camaya Bali: Bamboo House
Camaya Bali: Bamboo House
Camaya Bali: Bamboo House
Camaya Bali: Bamboo House
Camaya Bali: Bamboo House
Camaya Bali: Bamboo House
Camaya Bali: Bamboo House
Camaya Bali: Bamboo House
Camaya Bali: Bamboo House

See the Selat Rice Fields

Selat is roughly 45 km (28 miles) north east of Ubud. The drive takes just under an hour and a half, but you will drive through an amazing landscape of rice fields and farms. The climate of this side of the island feels much different than the hot beaches in the south. The rice fields in Selat are high above sea level resulting in cool and moderate temperatures throughout the day/night.

The first picture below is actually at Mahagiri Panoramic Resort & Restaurant. This open style restaurant offers a stunning view overlooking working rice fields while you eat your meal. The food is decent enough but one review summed it up perfectly, 'you don't go for the food - you go for the view.'

10 Best Places to Instagram in Bali: Selat Rice Fields
10 Best Places to Instagram in Bali: Selat Rice Fields
IMG_1600-2 - 720 4x5
See how this fits into our Eco Friendly Bali Itinerary
See how this fits into our Eco Friendly Bali Itinerary

Camaya Restaurant

Each of the Airbnb listings at Camaya Bali come with a free breakfast with your choice of an omelette, a banana pancake, or scrambled eggs and toast. The first course of breakfast comes with your choice of tea or coffee and fresh fruit.

Lunch and dinner are also delicious and fairly reasonably priced, but the portions are moderate (as with most Balinese dishes). Nonetheless, the restaurant is an intimate experience with only 4 tables that overlooks the working rice fields. At dinner you will experience a beautiful sunset painting the sky a blend of fiery orange colors. If you ask Made he will even play softly relaxing music on his handmade Gambang, a balinese style xylophone made out of bamboo.

IMG_1974-2 - 720 4x5__2
IMG_1972 - 720 4x5__3 copy
IMG_1974-2 - 720 4x5__2
IMG_1972 - 720 4x5__3 copy
IMG_1533 - 720 4x5
Camaya Bali Restaurant
IMG_1533 - 720 4x5
Camaya Bali Restaurant
Camaya Bali Restaurant
IMG_1544 - 720 4x5__2
Camaya Bali Restaurant
IMG_1544 - 720 4x5__2

Camaya Staff

Made, the owner of Camaya Bali, built both of the Airbnb residences on the property. In his presence you can feel the energy of someone that is a figure head in the community. Made says that everything he does is for his family, and wants his guests to feel as though they are kin.

Opening only a few years ago, he has employed his family and friends to help with the upkeep and intended expansion. In March 2019, he hopes to open up two more bungalows on the property thus doubling his business and opening up more opportunities to improve the lives in the members of his community.

Camaya Bali Staff
Made: Owner of Camaya Bali
Camaya Bali Staff
Made: Owner of Camaya Bali
Camaya Bali Staff
The Camaya Bali Family Staff
Camaya Bali Staff
The Camaya Bali Family Staff

All-in-All

Our overall experience with Camaya Bali was much more than we had expected. The hospitality was a bit overwhelming at points since we really weren't used to that level of attention. However, the staff are more than willing to give your private space if you ask them. On the flip side, they are always eager to help you plan your day or give you advice about what to do in Selat.

Their list of activities to do is quite expansive:

  • Motorbike Rental: 60,000 IDR per day (~$4.28 USD)
  • Balinese Massage: 125,000 IDR per person (~$8.91 USD)
  • Tours and Treks: 150,000-1,000,000 IDR (~$11-$71 USD)
    • Tours vary from trekking in the rice fields around the property to half and full day tours around local landmarks that include a private driver.
  • Private Driver: 250,000 IDR (~$17.82 USD)

If you're planning on coming to Camaya Bali, they let you know that it is a pretty remote location (roughly 80 minutes to Ubud) so you will be paying extra for the seclusion. There are no ATMs or shops within walking distance, but they are just a short motorbike ride away. Make sure you bring plenty of cash because credit cards are not accepted.

We wanted to give it a shot to experience a couple days in luxury but it was definitely not what we were used to. If you're a backpacker in a budget, then it might be worth picking a more budget friendly lodging like a hostel closer into town. Nonetheless, the couple we met staying in the bamboo house was celebrating their anniversary and had an absolute blast making the most of everything Camaya Bali had to offer. This property certainly caters to a more 'luxury' experience so be prepared for the price tag if you want to soak it up here 🙂

Back to Indonesia >>

How to get to Taj Mahal Day Trip Guide

April 4, 2019

Bangkok on a Budget: A Backpacker Guide

January 2, 2019

Camaya Bali: A Jungle Oasis in Selat

December 19, 2018

Best Trekking and Homestay in Sapa, Vietnam

March 1, 2019

Nusa Penida: Weekend Trip Guide

December 29, 2018

Best Things to do in Hanoi, Vietnam

February 27, 2019

Everything to know for your Ha Giang Loop Itinerary

March 7, 2019

Best Budget Friendly Things to do Phnom Penh

February 3, 2019

Balibola: Best Flexitarian Food in Bali

December 13, 2018

Day Trip to Malacca

December 8, 2018

Singapore Backpacker Guide: Best Budget Friendly Things to do

December 12, 2018

Top 10 Things to do in Canggu

December 16, 2018

Weekend Guide to Cat Ba, Vietnam

March 14, 2019

Budget Guide to Chiang Mai Thailand

January 6, 2019

Trash Hero Gili Air: Keeping the Island clean

December 26, 2018

Best things to do in Dalat Weekend Guide

March 26, 2019

Guide to Jaipur: How to see the Pink City for 200 Rupees

April 3, 2019

Eco Friendly Bali Travel Itinerary: Two Weeks

December 30, 2018

Self Guided Tour of Phong Nha Ke Bang National Park

March 19, 2019

The Most Ethical Elephant Sanctuaries in Chiang Mai

January 5, 2019

5 Free Things to do in Abu Dhabi Day Trip Guide

April 6, 2019

Bali: The Best Instagram Spots you don’t see

December 22, 2018

10 Cheap Things to do in Hoi An

March 24, 2019

Budget Guide to Pai: Backpacker Paradise

February 17, 2019

Self Guided Angkor Wat Tour: 1-3 Day Guide

February 8, 2019

How to Apply for a Cambodia E-Visa

February 1, 2019

10 Best Places to Instagram in Bali

December 24, 2018

How to Apply for a Vietnam Visa

February 20, 2019

Eco Friendly Diving Koh Tao, Thailand

January 24, 2019

Lombok: 4 Day Guide of Gili Air Island

December 27, 2018

Bali: The Best Instagram Spots you don’t see

December 22, 2018

How to Apply for a Vietnam Visa

February 20, 2019

Lombok: 4 Day Guide of Gili Air Island

December 27, 2018

The Most Ethical Elephant Sanctuaries in Chiang Mai

January 5, 2019

Best Things to do in Hanoi, Vietnam

February 27, 2019

Balibola: Best Flexitarian Food in Bali

December 13, 2018

How to get to Taj Mahal Day Trip Guide

April 4, 2019

Trash Hero Gili Air: Keeping the Island clean

December 26, 2018

Best Trekking and Homestay in Sapa, Vietnam

March 1, 2019

10 Cheap Things to do in Hoi An

March 24, 2019

Self Guided Angkor Wat Tour: 1-3 Day Guide

February 8, 2019

How to Apply for a Cambodia E-Visa

February 1, 2019

Day Trip to Malacca

December 8, 2018

Best things to do in Dalat Weekend Guide

March 26, 2019

Bangkok on a Budget: A Backpacker Guide

January 2, 2019

Nusa Penida: Weekend Trip Guide

December 29, 2018

Best Budget Friendly Things to do Phnom Penh

February 3, 2019

Self Guided Tour of Phong Nha Ke Bang National Park

March 19, 2019

Top 10 Things to do in Canggu

December 16, 2018

Camaya Bali: A Jungle Oasis in Selat

December 19, 2018

Everything to know for your Ha Giang Loop Itinerary

March 7, 2019

Budget Guide to Pai: Backpacker Paradise

February 17, 2019

Singapore Backpacker Guide: Best Budget Friendly Things to do

December 12, 2018

Guide to Jaipur: How to see the Pink City for 200 Rupees

April 3, 2019

Eco Friendly Diving Koh Tao, Thailand

January 24, 2019

5 Free Things to do in Abu Dhabi Day Trip Guide

April 6, 2019

Eco Friendly Bali Travel Itinerary: Two Weeks

December 30, 2018

Budget Guide to Chiang Mai Thailand

January 6, 2019

10 Best Places to Instagram in Bali

December 24, 2018

Weekend Guide to Cat Ba, Vietnam

March 14, 2019
By |2019-05-15T04:52:54-04:00December 19th, 2018|Asia, Bali, Indonesia|0 Comments

Leave A Comment